Buying Protein Powder and Supplements in Japan

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UPDATE (8/10/2016): Make sure you take advantage of the weekly deals at iHerb.com. You get 20% off of the selected brands. Sometimes there’s brands that have whey protein, so you can stock up on it. But be sure to buy in the beginning of the week because they’re usually sold out after a few days. To see what brands are part of the weekly deals, click here. I will also occasionally post coupon codes near the bottom of the page, so be sure to check back now and then to take advantage of it.

UPDATE (9/19/2015): So I’ve been lifting and watching what I eat consistently for about 14 months now. I won’t talk about my gains, but I will say that I’m pretty satisfied with the results. If you have any questions or want advice, feel free to comment below. Over the course of 14 months, I still haven’t found a cheaper option for protein and supplements than iHerb. However, I have developed a list of products that I have been ordering consistently: whey protein, creatine, pre-workout, multi-vitamins, fish oil, and protein bars (optional). I’ve ordered the products by level of importance, with whey protein being the most important. Protein bars are optional, but I recommend it for those who are busy and don’t have time to cook a quality protein packed meal. Furthermore, the protein bars that I order are packed with 15-20 grams of fiber! Also, I tried to find products with the most value for each category. In other words, I found the cheapest quality product with good reviews for each category.

If you want to add all the above items to your cart, simply click here.

TIP: What I usually do when ordering protein is I set the filter for price to $10 to $50 via the left menu. This narrows down the whey protein by price. Then I sort the results by “Heaviest” which can be found on the top left area of the results box. What this does is that is shows only whey protein priced from $10 to $50 with the heaviest ones first. The heavier ones are usually the 5LB proteins. When you buy more protein, it usually is cheaper. Then with the price filter I had set above, I know I won’t be spending all my salary on just protein. I also recommend buying more of the same product, rather than buying 4 different products. Some products will give you a discount if you buy a bulk amount starting from 4. Also from time to time, there will be sales where there are massive discounts so be on the lookout for those.

The Return

I apologize for the recent disappearance. I’ve been very busy and finally started to settle down living in Japan. In fact, I’ve even joined a gym. Not no local gym that’s sponsored by the government where you pay about 400 yen to get in each time and you have a time limit of 2 hours. Each ward should have it’s own. Those gyms are meant for the old people in Japan, where there’s an abundance of. I mean no offense to the elderly, but I say this because the gyms are not equipped for bodybuilding, let alone just getting in shape. I’ve been to two different local gyms and none of them even have a bench press, which is probably the most popular workout ever. Anyway, there just happened to be an Anytime Fitness that opened up nearby. For their grand opening, they waived registration fees and the key card fee (this is what lets you in). I pay around 7,000 yen or about $70 a month. Yes, that’s no mistake, I said $70 a month. Welcome to Japan. Actually, $70 per month is considered cheap in Japan. Most gyms here cost over $100 a month. No joke. And on top of that, those gyms are not opened 24 hours. Depending on your membership, you can only go during certain days. Furthermore, you can only go during certain times during those certain days. I’m not joking. Luckily for me, Anytime Fitness is opened 24 hours, hence the “Anytime” and I can go whenever. To add to that, I can go to any Anytime Fitness location, not just in Japan, but worldwide. I’ve actually already taken advantage of that and have been to 3 different locations in Tokyo. All this for only $70 a month. It’s a freaking steal in Japan, right? Okay, I went overboard with the introduction and I haven’t even started the topic yet. If you’re serious about training and want to learn more, check out my post on How to Lose, Gain, or Maintain Weight.

Anytime Fitness - Tokyo, Japan

Anytime Fitness – Tokyo, Japan

Bodybuilding

So after joining a gym, I wanted to buy whey protein powder and supplements. Apparently, buying protein powder and supplements in Japan is super expensive. I know stores like Don Quijote have whey protein and supplements, but super expensive and their brands that I’ve never heard of (Japanese generic brands). I’m not hating on the Japanese brands, but if I’m buying expensive whey protein and supplements, I’m gonna buy it from brands that are at least known in the bodybuilding industry. And so I did some research. I remember back in the states, I would order from Bodybuilding.com. Turns out you can change the country of the store, meaning they can ship to Japan! I was stoked. Prices were decent and there’s always deals and coupons to get a steal. Prices were even in yen and it was all in English. I thought it was too good to be true. And it was. When I got to the checkout page, the shipping fee was a lot. Although there were 3 options to choose from, the Super Saver option was still super expensive. The shipping fee pretty much killed the deal.

iHerb

And back to researching I went when I came upon a website called iHerb.com. Despite the name, there were also a whole bunch of other types of products such as beauty products, herbs, some other stuff, and most importantly, “supplements and sports”. Although iHerb’s prices of whey protein weren’t that great, the prices of their supplements were. However, keep in mind that the shipping fee makes up for the higher cost of protein powder which I’ll talk about more in a bit. There was even a coupon that took $10 off if you’re a new customer. I’ll talk more about the coupon later. And lastly, most importantly, the shipping was “cheap”. Shipping was only $4.00. Yes, ONLY $4, well as long as your order was under 30 pounds. But that’s a steal! I could order 30lbs of whey protein and shipping would only be $4. And on top of that, delivery time is 3-5 days. That’s crazy. Furthermore, if your order totals $40 or more, you get FREE SHIPPING. Wait, there’s still more. If your order is over $60, you can an extra 5% off on top of that. Tell me not, that’s a steal. I should stop here. I feel like if I continue, this article will never end. Ugh, here we go… I just remembered that iHerb has a trials or samples page. What that means is that there’s a bunch of samples that you can try for as low as $0.25. On top of my protein powder order, I added a whole bunch of $0.25 and $0.50 items to my cart. Even if I didn’t need it, I still added it anyway. But yeah, be sure to check out the trials page too.

Beware of Customs Fees

iHerb has it written on the website, but I had to learn this the hard way. For those that are ordering from Japan, make sure your total order doesn’t exceed 16000 yen. When I shop on iHerb, I have the currency set as US dollars. Use a currency exchange calculator and make sure the value in yen is under 16000 yen. Just to be safe, make sure the value is at least 1000 to 2000 yen under 16000 yen. You will be charged an extra 3000 yen for custom fees if your total price is above 16000 yen. You will have to give the 3000 yen to the delivery person in order to receive your products. If you cancel, you won’t get a 100% refund. So the best thing you can do is make sure you don’t order anything that exceeds 16000 yen.

Conclusion

Hopefully, this article will point you in the right direction in getting quality well-known protein and supplements for an affordable price and quick delivery time. I know things in Japan are expensive, but I feel there has to be a better option sometimes. I wish you the best of luck in achieving your fitness goals.

iHerb Coupon Details

UPDATE (12/10/2016): Enjoy 10% off any order over $40, now through Monday (12/12). Simply type in coupon code GET10 on the checkout page.

*Please note that this 10% discount code may not be combined with other online discounts.

Enter the code DPJ857 to get 10% off your first order. First-time customers only.

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Buying a Computer in Japan

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Buying a Computer in Japan

Broken Laptop Screen

Broken Laptop Screen

I came home under the influence one night and I tried to start my computer or laptop to be exact. Unfortunately, it couldn’t start. I’ve been having this problem a few times now, but eventually it would somehow start up again with no problems. However, the night it wasn’t working happened to be a crucial moment in my life: Game 1 of the NBA Playoffs between the Brooklyn Nets and Toronto Raptors. Go Nets! Due to being under the influence and the frustration from my broken computer, I stupidly ended up punching my laptop screen. Although the computer was unable to start up already, there still may have been a small chance that it could possibly start up. Unfortunately, I completely cancelled out that small chance by destroying the laptop screen. With no laptop in my life, I needed to buy a new computer in Japan right away.

The first thing I did was do some research. Luckily, my girlfriend still had a working laptop (although I have a Samsung Galaxy S4 smartphone with wifi access, I would rather use a PC). So I go online and google “buying a computer in Japan” and I find out that there’s some problems that I might be faced with when buying a computer in Japan.

Problems with Buying a Computer in Japan

Computers sold in Japan usually come with a Japanese OS and Japanese keyboard. By Japanese OS, I mean that the operating system (Windows 7, 8, etc.) will be in Japanese. And by Japanese keyboard, I mean that the keyboard will be in a Japanese format. Turns out Japanese keyboards and keyboards in the rest of the world are different. Japanese keyboards have extra keys and the layout is different. Although the Japanese keyboards do have English, such as letters, written on it, just the fact that the layout is different will cause me some problems when I’m typing. I type pretty fast, but if the layout of the keyboard is different from what I’m used to, I’ll be typing the wrong keys. I have also heard that some stores offer the option of an English OS and/or keyboard, but it will end up costing a lot more. Another option is to buy a Mac from Apple, which has the option of having an English OS and keyboard. But Macs are just so expensive and I’m more of the PC user. So having a Japanese OS and keyboard might be one of the problems I’ll be faced with when buying a computer in Japan.

Another problem I might run into is the language barrier. Most of us know that the Japanese aren’t really good at speaking English, let alone speaking about technical stuff such as computers. Luckily, my girlfriend speaks Japanese and this was truly helpful in buying a computer in Japan. However, not everyone will have this option. But do not worry, I believe it’s still possible even without knowing any Japanese. I’ll explain more later.

Buying a Computer in Japan Online

If you want to buy a computer in Japan online, I recommend going kakaku.com.The website is in Japanese, but do not let it scare you. I’ll give you a brief guide on how to use it. So after going to the site, click on the link that says “パソコン”. It has a picture of a laptop or notebook to the left. Then scroll down a little and you’ll see icons of desktops, laptops, PDAs, and so on. Click on the laptop icon (or whatever you want to buy) and then you’ll see a list of the top 5 sellers. Below it is a list of all the laptops they have. Now, on the left you’ll see a list of filters which is all in English. Choose your brand, OS, CPU, display size, color, price range, and so on. After you find one you like, click on it and you’ll see the product description. For some products, you’ll see a list of prices offered by different vendors ranked from cheapest to most expensive. It’ll show you where the product is and what services they offer, such as shipping or in-store pick up. I won’t go deep into this, because you’ll probably need a translator for further information.

Buying a Computer in Japan Offline

Most people recommended going to Akihabara to buy a computer. As you may already know, Akihabara is famous for electronics. I’ve also read that there are some stores who have English speaking personnel. However, since I live near Shinjuku, and I didn’t want to go that far to buy a computer, I decided to just shop at Shinjuku. I had two places in mind, Bic Camera and Yodabashi Camera, two of the largest electronic retail stores in Japan. First I went to Bic Camera. I went to the floor where the computers were located and started looking around. They divided the sections by laptops and desktops. It further broke down into brand names. There were also some computers on sale that were placed in the front of the computer section. I had a game plan in mind already, so I didn’t need to talk to the attendants. Each computer model has a paper with a description of the computer details which are all in English, well at least the necessary parts such as the OS, CPU, RAM, etc. I couldn’t find something to my liking so I decided not to buy anything at Bic Camera. One thing I did realize is that computers in Japan are expensive! I thought it would of been cheaper, but I think computers in Japan are actually more expensive than they are in the United States. Anyway, the next stop was Yodobashi Camera so here we go.

At Yodobashi Camera in Shinjuku, the computer area was on the first floor. The layout of the computers was similar to that of Bic Camera, where computers were categorized by desktops and laptops, and then by brand names. The prices here were expensive as well, but I think it was actually a little cheaper here than Bic Camera.

Buying Process

The model I wanted had three different pricings. This was because they had already planned out three different options you could choose from, of course the one with better parts being more expensive. However, I think this was done for the customers, who didn’t know much about computers, so that they could easily buy from just choosing 1 of the 3 options. I’m not a computer enthusiast, but I at least know some of the basics. So when I was ready, I called for an attendant and told them I wanted this model and this option. I figured I’d choose the cheapest option and work from there. What I mean by that is that you can customize your computer like you would if you were to buy from Dell online. So pretty much this is the part where my girlfriend helped, well, for the non-computer related parts. We needed to sign up for a points card if we wanted to take advantage of a sale that was going on and so we did or I should say my girlfriend did. So for the computer, the attendant handed me a list of customization options. Pretty much I could choose the CPU, OS, keyboard, amount of RAM, disk drive, display, etc. Each option also had the pricing to the side. It was exactly like buying a computer on the Dell website, but on paper. I wish they had this sheet out on display to begin with. Anyway, so yes I did mention OS and keyboard. I was able to choose an English OS and keyboard. The English OS didn’t cost extra but the English keyboard required an extra 1,080 yen. Not too bad in my opinion. But keep in mind, I chose Windows 8.1. I’m not sure if the English OS is available for previous versions of Windows. So that eliminated the OS and keyboard problem. I originally started from a price of about 63,000 yen and ended up with a price of about 82,000 yen. But because my girlfriend signed up for the point card, we were able to take advantage of the sale and the price was reduced by about 10,000 yen. So my total came out to about 72,000 yen or about 720 dollars. Tax and shipping was already included. I tried asking if foreigners get a discount because I read that some places offered it, but the attendant said there wasn’t. Oh well. Speaking of foreigners, I did overhear a female attendant speaking English to a few foreigners. Her English wasn’t good, but just the fact that she was speaking English means that maybe this could eliminate the second problem of buying a computer in Japan. After we were done with that part, the attendant read us some of the guidelines such as warranty and returns (or at least that’s what I think it was since my Japanese isn’t that good). Finally, the attendant took us to the cashier where I payed with my Chase Sapphire credit card which has no foreign transaction fees. Woohoo!

Shipping

Okay, this was probably the biggest setback. The attendant told us that shipping could take anywhere from 2-4 weeks. What the f***. I was seriously contemplating about just stopping right then and there, and this was after I was done customizing the order with the attendant. My computer broke so I needed a computer right away, which is one of the reasons why I went in person to buy a laptop from the store. If this was the case, I should of just bought a laptop online (or maybe online wouldn’t even have made a difference because that might of took 2-4 weeks to ship as well)! I understand that because I am customizing my computer, it’ll take some time, but not 2-4 weeks time! Dell only takes at most 1 week. Argh, this is going to be the hardest 2-4 weeks of my life.

Conclusion

In conclusion, buying a computer in Japan is not that hard and does not require the ability to speak Japanese. Maybe in the past, things were different which made it difficult to buy a computer in Japan due to the OS and keyboard. But I think now, the bigger stores will have the option of choosing an English OS and keyboard. Also, the bigger stores should also have staff who could speak enough English to help you with your purchase. The key thing to keep in mind is that shipping can take up to 4 weeks. So if your computer is broken or if you didn’t bring one to Japan, you’ll have to figure out something to do during those 4 weeks that you’re without a computer. I’ve listed the address of Bic Camera and Yodobashi Camera in Shinjuku below. I hope my experience of buying a computer in Japan will help those who are planning to buy a computer in Japan. Good luck.

EDIT (May 9, 2014): My laptop finally arrived. After waiting for a little over 2 weeks, it was finally shipped to my address in a box. Time to get busy! I already feel rejuvenated.

Bic Camera, Shinjuku
1-5-1 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo 160-0023
+81 3-5326-1111

 

Yodobashi Camera, Shinjuku
1-11-1 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo 160-0023
+81 3-3346-1010

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How to Lose, Gain, or Maintain Weight

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Here’s a short and simple write-up of how to lose, gain, or maintain weight.

Calorie Intake

First off, you have to figure out how many calories your body needs to maintain your weight. You can use this calorie intake calculator from bodybuilding.com: http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/macronutcal.htm

Let’s call your calorie intake the base rate. For example, mines is about 2,250 calories. So in other words, I have to eat about 2,250 calories everyday in order keep my body weight the same. After figuring out your base rate, you can decide to lose weight, gain weight, or stay the same weight.

If you want to lose weight, obviously you have to eat less. However, note that if you eat too little all of  a sudden, your body may think that you’re starving and will go into starvation mode. This is bad because in starvation mode, your body’s metabolism will slow down which is the opposite of what we want. Your body will also try to conserve energy and store fat. A good amount to eat less is probably around 250-500 less calories. So if my base rate is about 2,250 calories and I want to lose weight, a good amount to drop it too is: 1,750 calories. Do this for about a week or two, then drop another 250-500 calories for the next week or two. Keep doing this until you’re at your desired weight.

For example, if I want to lose weight and I have a base rate of 2,250 calories. I’d have to eat about 1,750 calories per day. I’d continue doing this for about 1-2 weeks. If I’m happy with my weight, then I’ll just stay at this amount. However, if I want to keep losing weight, then I’d have to drop my calories even lower because by then my body has already adjusted to 1,750 calories. In other words, my base rate has now become 1,750 calories. Everyone’s body and lifestyle is different, so you might even have to do it for 2-3 weeks before making a change in your calorie count.

On the other hand, if you want to gain weight then eat more. If my base rate is about 2,250 calories, then I should eat about 250-500 calories more. So about 2,750 calories per day.

Obviously if you want to stay the same weight, then just eat the same amount of calories as your base rate.

Keep in mind that not all calories are created equal. Eating fat foods and healthy foods that have the same amount of calories will not give you the same results. What this means is that eating 1,750 calories of McDonald’s is not the same as eating 1,750 calories of clean eating. Obviously, we want to eat clean. So whether you’re losing weight, gaining weight, or trying to stay the same weight, do try to eat healthy.

There’s a lot more I can talk about but this is probably enough to get you started. Hopefully now you have a better idea on how to lose, gain, or maintain weight. To start, I recommend you actually count the calories you’re eating tomorrow. You don’t have to be 100% accurate (pro bodybuilders do because it’s their profession), just estimate using a calorie counter app or something. For example, if I estimated that I actually ate about 3,000 calories today. However, I calculated that my base rate is actually 2,000 calories so I’m eating an extra 1,000 calories. Which means I’m gaining weight! So I should make a change in my calorie intake But that doesn’t mean I should be eating 2,000 calories tomorrow. That’s a 1,000 calorie difference from yesterday. Again, this will make your body think you’re starving which is not good since your body will start storing food as fat. Instead we have to gradually decrease our calorie intake. So maybe tomorrow I will eat about 2,750 calories. Then slowly and gradually work my way down towards my base rate.

Types of Food

For protein, you should eat fish, skinless chicken, turkey, tuna, lean beef, eggs, whey protein, milk, yogurt, etc. For good fats, you should eat avocados, olive oil, nuts, etc. Good fats actually help you burn fat. And for carbohydrates, you should eat vegetables and complex carbs or slow digesting carbs such as brown rice, oats, whole wheat bread, etc. However, you can also eat fast digesting carbs such as white rice, noodles, potatoes, etc. but only immediately after you wake up or after your workout. Why? Because when you’re sleeping (you can’t eat while you’re sleeping so you need food as soon as possible upon waking) and after you’ve worked out (used up energy from an intense workout), you need to replenish your energy. If you don’t, the body will go into starvation mode and first target your muscles for energy which is not good. Unfortunately, the body doesn’t target our fat first.

Tips

Here are some simple tips:

  • Drink a lot of water (this also helps you feel full)
  • Eat a lot of meals, every 3 hours (what I do is eat 3 main meals: breakfast, lunch, and dinner, but in between those meals I’ll have a snack such as yogurt, nuts, protein bar, protein shake, etc.)
  • Eat a lot of fiber to help digest food (fiber bars, cereal, etc)
  • Never give up. If you’re feeling lazy to go to the gym, go watch a motivation video on YouTube.

Supplements

If you’re in Japan, I recommend buying supplements online from iHerb.com. The prices are much cheaper than supplement products in Japan (honestly, I don’t think they’re that good either) and there’s free shipping (arrives within a week). Below are some links for your convenience. I’ve also attached a referral code so you can get a discount if you’re a first-time user. I buy all my pre-workout, creatine, whey protein, and other supplements from here and I’m definitely spending a lot less money if I were to buy Japanese supplements.

Please see this post and scroll down to the bottom for my tips on how to get a steal on buying whey protein. You can also use it for buying other supplements as well.

Supplements

Supplements

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Gold’s Gym Japan

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A little over a month ago, I decided to make the big jump from Joyfit 24 to the famous Gold’s Gym Japan. Known throughout the world, Gold’s Gym is known for the place where hardcore lifters go and oh boy did it not disappoint. The change from Joyfit 24 to Gold’s Gym was like middle school to a university. The gym was bigger, better, and badder (in a good way). The selection in equipment was mind-blowing. More than half the equipment there were equipment I’d only see on TV or on the computer. With the wide variety of equipment, it’s almost impossible to hit a plateau! On the walls were pictures of actual bodybuilders and athletes. There were even TV screens with videos of professional bodybuilders. Not only was the atmosphere intense, but so were the people. The crowd was much noticeably bigger and serious, both male and females. Almost everyone would take a protein shake and/or pre-workout shakeout. Not to mention, there is also a protein shake bar which you can purchase a shake from the vending machine. If you’ve been seriously lifting for at least 2 years, then I think you’re ready to move onto signing up for Gold’s Gym. Another interesting thing is that there’s a women’s training zone, where only women are allowed to enter. No idea why they have this. Maybe girls don’t like to use machines that were used by sweaty men? Also, they have studios where there are classes almost everyday. There are other things like saunas, jacuzzi, and stuff, but it varies location by location. Like most other gyms in Japan, you’re required to bring your gym shoes and change when you get there. There are also showers there, but it’s not as private. You get your own stall, but it’s not really that private. I think you’re supposed to go in butt naked, but I just go in with my boxers on and bring a towel and my new pair inside with me.

The main reason that took me so long to switch over to Gold’s Gym Japan was definitely the price factor. When signing up, I had to pay around 24,000 JPY upfront (includes the 1st month’s pay). Then every month after that, I have to pay 12,000 JPY (excluding tax). This is roughly $120 USD per month! The average back in the states is about $30 USD per month! Japan is expensive, but this is super expensive! It was a plus that I can go to any Gold’s Gym with this membership, but this is a standard already. Almost all gyms allow that! But this change was definitely needed for me. Going to my previous gym, I felt my motivation dropping day by day. Not only was the equipment limited, which limited the variation of my workouts, but the atmosphere was boring there. There was no competition and motivation. It’s like I was riding my bicycle I had when I was a child, I’ve outgrown it.

Golds Gym Japan

Golds Gym Japan

Gold’s Gym Japan is definitely on another level when compared to other gyms. If you’re a seriously lifter, the location is convenient, and membership price isn’t a problem, then definitely make the change. If not, I recommend just sticking with the regular 24 hour fitness gyms like Anytime Fitness and Joyfit 24. Although Gold’s Gym is pretty good, it’s not 24 hours and some of the interior and equipment can be old. I’ve been to the Otsuka, Omotesando, Harajuku, and Shibuya location so far and hands down, Harajuku’s one is the best. The Harajuku location is open 24 hours, but the others aren’t. Also, I think they were recently renovated so the interior is new and the equipment is new (most of it). Also, they have a jacuzzi in the shower room which also was new! Almost forgot, Gold’s Gym is not open everyday. Depending on the location, the gym closes every 2nd or 3rd Monday of the month for maintenance purpsoes. Of all days, why do they choose Monday? Does Japan not know that Mondays is International Chest Day?

After working out, you could just get a protein shake from the protein shake bar but it does get pricey if you go 5 days per week. A shake costs roughly 400 JPY depending on how much protein you get, so you’ll roughly spend about 14,000 JPY on just post-workout protein shakes per month. If you’re on a budget, I recommend buying online from iHerb.com. I’ve listed some links for your convenience. I’ve also attached a referral code so you can get a discount. I buy all my pre-workout, creatine, whey protein, and other supplements from there and I definitely spend way less than 14,000 JPY per month (and that’s for everything, not just whey protein).

Please see this post and scroll down to the bottom for my tips on how to get a steal on buying whey protein. You can also use it for buying other supplements as well.

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Anytime Fitness VS Joyfit 24 Gym

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Before I get on with Anytime Fitness VS Joyfit 24 Gym, I would like to first apologize for the super long time it took to update the site. A lot of things happened and I just kind of got away from blogging.

I’ve actually moved away from Ikebukuro. I’m currently living in between Otsuka and Sugamo (although closer to Otsuka), which is just one stop away. Ikebukuro is a good place to live to have fun and go out and drink, but sleeping well at night is an entirely different issue. Although there’s not much to do in Otsuka, it is a much more quiet neighborhood. Since Anytime Fitness wasn’t convenient for me anymore, I decided to switch to a closer gym: Joyfit 24. Joyfit 24 is another fitness chain and is also opened 24 hours a day. I think only the ones with 24 in the name are opened 24 hours.

Anytime Fitness VS Joyfit 24 Gym

Anytime Fitness VS Joyfit 24 Gym

There wasn’t much difference between Joyfit 24 and Anytime Fitness, but I do feel that Anytime Fitness has better equipment. The price between the two gyms was around the same, roughly 8000 JPY (including tax). Both gyms are opened 24 hours, 7 days a week. Both gyms also have free lockers and private changing and shower rooms. Equipment for both gyms were fairly taken care of, if not new. The gyms don’t get too busy even during peak hours, but it may vary based on the locations. Obviously, the crowd for these gyms aren’t the hardcore gym rats. Not to be conceited, but I’m usually the most muscular (not strongest) person there. But then again, this is Japan and they’re not particular too concerned about muscles.

Correct me if I’m wrong, but I think Joyfit 24 requires customers to bring separate shoes for the gym. So you’re supposed to bring shoes specifically for the gym and you change into them once you get there. This is very common in Japan, so I wasn’t surprised. Anytime Fitness, didn’t have this policy which was great. Another difference was that Joyfit 24 actually had a free water fountain! Anytime Fitness didn’t. I don’t know if this was just the one location that I went to though.

Hopefully my post about Anytime Fitness VS Joyfit 24 Gym was helpful to you. The differences between the two weren’t big enough to have an affect in the deciding factor of which gym I’d choose. In the end, I was just happy with the more convenient location. Again, I recommend these gyms for the beginner to mid-intermediate level gym goers. Immediately after my workout, I would take my protein shake. I was one of the very few who ever did that at Joyfit 24 and Anytime Fitness in Japan. My point is that I felt I was like a college student attending a middle school in terms of the gym.

Speaking of protein, I recommend buying your protein (other any other supplement) from the following site: www.iHerb.com. I provided a referral code (DPJ857) in the link which will give you a discount of $5 (last time I checked it was).

TIP: What I usually do when ordering protein is I set the filter for price to $10 to $50 via the left menu. This narrows down the whey protein by price. Then I sort the results by “Heaviest” which can be found on the top left area of the results box. What this does is that is shows only whey protein priced from $10 to $50 with the heaviest ones first. The heavier ones are usually the 5LB proteins. When you buy more protein, it usually is cheaper. Then with the price filter I had set above, I know I won’t be spending all my salary on just protein. I also recommend buying more of the same product, rather than buying 4 different products. Some products will give you a discount if you buy a bulk amount starting from 4. Also from time to time, there will be sales where there are massive discounts so be on the lookout for those.

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